Where’s Winter?

As Thanksgiving dinner ended, the talk turned to the weather. Everyone was wondering how often North Dakota has snow on Thanksgiving and when we will finally see some of the frozen flakes. A white Thanksgiving is defined in this graphic as having snowpack of 1” or greater or measurable snowfall on that day. The historical…
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The Polar Front Part 2: The Jet Stream

The Polar Front Part 1: Highs and Lows (http://cloudburst.areavoices.com/2016/11/14/the-polar-front-part-1-warm-and-cold-fronts/) The jet stream: a big river of wind at high altitudes flying along at almost 200 miles per hour. It brings cold air from the north and warm air from the south. It pushes high and low pressure systems around, not just north or south, but…
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Curving Wind: The Coriolis Force

Have you ever wondered why hurricanes, low pressure systems and high pressure systems all spin the way they do? Or why they spin the opposite direction in the southern hemisphere? Maybe you’ve heard that toilets flush the other way in the southern hemisphere. Could that be the same reason why the winds switch too? Well,…
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Snow Place Like Home

Tis the season of sitting by the fire, drinking hot apple cider and watching the snowflakes falling. With most people experiencing the first snowfall and blizzard this past week, the question for most people is how many more blizzards are we going to have this season? For most of the United States the answer is…
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Wet, Dry, Repeat

For those of us that live in North America, the term monsoon is used rather lightly. We use it as a way to describe how intense the rain is in a single event. But what about countries like India, Bengal, and other surrounding countries. A monsoon there has a whole different meaning. To put a…
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